2014-2015 Graduate Calendar

Popular Culture  
Master of Arts in Popular Culture Go to top of document
Acting Dean Ingrid Makus (until June 30, 2014) Faculty of Social Sciences Associate Dean Diane Dupont Faculty of Social Sciences Core Faculty Professors David Butz (Geography), Martin Danahay (English Language and Literature), Barry K. Grant (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Rosemary Hale (History), Michael Ripmeester (Geography), Marilyn Rose (English Language and Literature) Associate Professors Nick Baxter-Moore (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Michael Berman (Philosophy), Jeff Boggs (Geography), Jackie Botterill (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Marian Bredin (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Tim Dun (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Derek Foster (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Jennifer Good (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Scott Henderson (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Ann Howey (English Language and Literature), Russell Johnston (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Sarah Matheson (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Christie Milliken (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Bohdan Nebesio (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Shauna Pomerantz (Child and Youth Studies), Barbara Seeber (English), Hans Skott-Myhre (Child and Youth Studies), Jeannette Sloniowski (Communication, Popular Culture and Film) Assistant Professors Dale Bradley (Communication, Popular Culture and Film), Peter Lester (Communication, Popular Culture and Film) Graduate Program Director Sarah Matheson smatheson@brocku.ca Program Coordinator Amanda Bishop 905-688-5550, extension 3553 SBH 318 abishop@brocku.ca http://www.brocku.ca/social-sciences/current-students/graduate-programs/ma-in-popular-culture  
Program Description Go to top of document
The Interdisciplinary MA Program in Popular Culture is housed in the Department of Communication, Popular Culture and Film. Its participating faculty are drawn from a number of different departments across the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Faculty of Humanities, but they all share the common view that the study of Popular Culture in its varied forms is a valuable and worthwhile scholarly endeavour that enables us to understand how societies, including our own, function and thrive. The forms of Popular Culture include literary texts and works of art as well as the mass media, including television, film, radio, recordings, advertising, newspapers and magazines, sport, rituals, fashion and fads. The study of Popular Culture in the program involves analyzing these expressive forms as aesthetic objects whose meaning depends on and illuminates the social, historical and cultural contexts in which they are created, disseminated, interpreted and used. Methods range from textual analysis to ethnographic observation and participant interviews.  
Admission Requirements Go to top of document
Successful completion of an Honours Bachelor's degree, or equivalent, in a relevant discipline (for example, English, Film Studies, Fine Arts, History, Music, Political Science, Sociology, Canadian Studies, Communication Studies or Women's Studies), with an average of not less than 75%. Applicants will usually be expected to have completed some courses related to Cultural Studies, Popular Culture or Media Studies as part of their undergraduate programs. The Graduate Admissions Committee will review all applications and recommend admission for a limited number of suitable candidates. Individuals interested in part-time study should consult with the Graduate Program Director.  
Degree Requirements Go to top of document
Students in the MA Program in Popular Culture follow either Scheme A or Scheme B. The usual path to the MA in Popular Culture is Scheme A. Students must apply to enter Scheme B in accordance with the conditions outlined in the program's Handbook and Guidelines for Research Proposals. All students must consult with the Graduate Program Director when planning their programs of study. Scheme A: Course Work and Major Research Paper For full-time students, Scheme A is normally a four-term program. Students in Scheme A are required to complete six half-credit courses in addition to the MA Major Research Paper (PCUL 5F95). The graduate core courses, PCUL 5P01 and 5P02, are compulsory for all students in Scheme A. The other four PCUL half-credit courses will normally be the four courses offered by the Program each year from the variable topics series described in the course bank: these are Historical Perspectives on Popular Culture (PCUL 5V20-29), Issues and Themes in Popular Culture (PCUL 5V30-39), Genres of Popular Culture (PCUL 5V40-49), Forms of Popular Culture (PCUL 5V50-59), and Local, National and International Popular Cultures (PCUL 5V60-69). Normally, a course will be offered from each series at least once every two years. Under exceptional circumstances, students in Scheme A may be permitted to substitute a directed reading course/tutorial (taken as PCUL 5P04) or a course offered by another graduate program for one of the non-core (i.e., variable topics) PCUL graduate courses. Students wishing to make such a substitution must submit a written request in advance to the Graduate Program Director. No student may complete more than one reading course/tutorial and no student may take a reading course/tutorial with the supervisor of her/his major research paper. In addition to the course requirements, each student in Scheme A must complete a Major Research Paper (MRP) on a selected topic in the field of Popular Culture. This paper will be graded by the MRP supervisor and one other member of the graduate faculty. Scheme B: Course Work and Thesis For full-time students, Scheme B is normally a six-term program. Students in Scheme B are required to complete four half-credit courses in addition to the MA Thesis (PCUL 5F90). The graduate core courses, PCUL 5P01 and 5P02, are compulsory for all students. The other two PCUL half-credit courses required for Scheme B will be selected from the four courses offered by the Program each year from the variable topics series described in the course bank: these are Historical Perspectives on Popular Culture (PCUL 5V20-29), Issues and Themes in Popular Culture (PCUL 5V30-39), Genres of Popular Culture (PCUL 5V40-49), Forms of Popular Culture (PCUL 5V50-59), and Local, National and International Popular Cultures (PCUL 5V60-69). Normally, a course will be offered from each series at least once every two years. In addition to course requirements, each student in Scheme B must complete, and defend at a public oral examination, a thesis that demonstrates capacity for independent work and original research or thought. The thesis topic shall be chosen in consultation with the supervisor and other members of the supervisory committee. A formal thesis proposal must be approved before research commences on the thesis.  
Facilities Go to top of document
The program has a designated Graduate Student Office with several networked computers, telephones, study space, and office space. Graduate students in the Popular Culture program have access to a number of special collections, including the Skene-Melvin collection of crime fiction, a growing popular music archive in the Department of Communication, Popular Culture and Film, the film and video archive housed in the same Department, the archives of the Niagara Popular Culture research project on local popular culture, and numerous other special collections of books, music and archival material in the James A. Gibson Library. Brock University's location in Niagara, close to wineries, tourist attractions, Niagara Falls, and many sites of historical interest, as well as its proximity to major cities such as Toronto and Buffalo, provide numerous opportunities for field research and close examination of diverse forms, sites and practices of popular culture. As a result, students with research interests in the study of local popular cultures are especially encouraged to apply.  
Course Descriptions Go to top of document
Students must check to ensure that prerequisites are met. Students may be deregistered, at the request of the instructor, from any course for which prerequisites and/or restrictions have not been met. PCUL 5F90 MA Thesis A research project involving the preparation and defence of a thesis, which shall demonstrate capacity for independent work and original research and thought. PCUL 5F95 Major Research Paper in Popular Culture A major essay which shall demonstrate capacity for independent work and original research or thought. PCUL 5P01 Cultural Theory and Popular Culture Historical and critical analysis of theories of popular culture from different disciplinary and cross-disciplinary perspectives. PCUL 5P02 Research Methods in Popular Culture Survey of research methods in popular culture and cultural studies, including their historical development, theoretical assumptions and practical applications. PCUL 5P04 Directed Reading in Popular Culture I Directed individual or group reading in an area of popular culture. Restriction: permission of the Director Note: may not be taken in place of PCUL 5P01 or 5P02. PCUL 5P05 Directed Reading in Popular Culture II Directed individual or group reading in an area of popular culture. Restriction: permission of the Director. Note: may not be taken in place of PCUL 5P01 or 5P02. PCUL 5V20-5V29 Historical Perspectives on Popular Culture Study of the popular culture of a particular historical period or an issue of popular culture in its historical context. PCUL 5V25 2014-2015: Radio Broadcasting A critical view of radio's emergence as a mass medium; its impact on Canadian society, culture, and politics; and comparative developments in other nations. PCUL 5V30-5V39 Issues and Themes in Popular Culture Focus on selected issues or themes in popular culture. PCUL 5V39 2014-2015: Place (Re)branding in the Cultural Economy (also offered as CDAM 5V39) Exploration of place (re)branding and its linkage to representations of the cultural economy. PCUL 5V40-5V49 Genres of Popular Culture Study of a particular genre across selected popular media, including film, literature, and television. PCUL 5V50-5V59 Forms of Popular Culture Study of a particular form of popular culture, including political economy, aesthetics, and cultural and historical significance. PCUL 5V56 2014-2015: Serious play: Counter-cultures within Postmodern Capitalism Exploration of counter-cultural movements from the late 60's to today. PCUL 5V60-5V69 Local, National and International Popular Cultures Study of popular culture in a selected region or nation, PCUL 5V65 2014-2015: Interrogating Local Popular Culture Critical study of popular culture in local identity, institutions, and events.  
Last updated: June 3, 2014 @ 04:23PM