Transmedia Research

Faculty of Social Sciences




Transmedia Research

1. Transmedia Diary
Brock University Advancement Fund, March 2012
Jacqueline Botterill, Marian Bredin, Tim Dun

Past research documents the types of media Canadians use, but we know little about how media are assembled by audiences to interact with content. The goal of this research is to develop and employ a research instrument to track how audiences flow across diverse media in a single day. Media time use studies are well established and widely used. A diary method asks people to note their media use as it, or shortly after, it happens. The study focuses on how audiences engage with and assemble different media throughout their day. We do not assume that audiences will use one medium at a time, instead, transmedia theory leads us to expect and account for media multitasking. To understand the contexts of transmedia practices, we will document not simply the number, type and time of media use, but also where people use media and for what reason they choose each medium. Our focus on a single day is important because it enables us to consider how media patterns map upon, mark and frame wider patterns of everyday life (breakfast, sleeping, lunch time, work, school, leisure time). We also gather basic demographic information from participants (gender, age, major) to aid our analysis of transmedia use. Approximately 400 first, second, third, and fourth year Communication Popular Culture and Film undergraduate students are being asked to volunteer to document their media use for one day. The Transmedia Diary was distributed in selected CPCF classes in March 2012 and additional data will be collected in September 2012. Student research assistants on the project are Tyler Running, Olivia Walker and Tinukshi Silva.

2. Transmedia's Uses and Gratifications in Hegemonic and Counterhegemonic Contexts
Council for Research in the Social Sciences, March 2012
Jennifer Good

In this research project, Professor Good is exploring how those involved with hegemonic and counterhegemonic movements make use, and make sense, of transmedia’s role in their work. Uses and Gratifications theory creates the foundations of this research in which members of various Occupy movements and executives from marketing/advertising agencies are interviewed to provide a picture of how sociopolitical orientation relates to transmedia technology. The Occupy Movement provides an excellent example of the powerful counterhegemonic role that transmedia can play in uprisings and calls for social change. Advertisers and marketers are, however, steadfastly researching transmedia's hegemonic potential for entrenching "business as usual" and encouraging capitalism's primary tenet of economic growth through ever increasing consumption. This research therefore explores how individuals with very different goals are embracing emerging technologies.
 

Door photo: A.M. Segova, Creative Commons

Door photo: A.M. Segova, Creative Commons