Eye Movements Help Understand Brain Development

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Eye Movements Help Understand Brain Development

Published on April 01 2014


Dr. Ayda Tekok-Kilic (CHYS) was recently awarded a grant from the Council for Research in the Social Sciences (CRISS) to study the development of executive functions that help individuals inhibit impulsive actions.  Using both EEG data and eye-tracking data, Dr. Tekok-Kilic will study the role of specific brain networks during the preparation for, and adjustment to incongruent actions by having her participants look at the direction opposite to the location that is cued on the computer.  This is known as an "anti-saccade" task.  According to Dr. Tekok-Kilic, "anti-saccade tasks have been used to investigate the brain's potential to inhibit a prepared response, which is an effortful and top-down process.  These simple yet powerful tasks have been administered to typical and atypical populations to study executive functions controlled by the prefrontal association cortex" of the brain.  She will perform her study in the Developmental Neuroscience lab in an attempt to understand more about how the ability to perform executive functions develop in children and youth.  Please contact Dr. Tekok-Kilic for further information.