Two Brock profs co-author “made-in-Canada” biology textbook

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Two Brock profs co-author “made-in-Canada” biology textbook

Published on November 11 2011


Thanks to the work of two Brock University professors, first-year university students studying biology in Canada no longer have to rely on U.S. textbooks.

Professors Fiona Hunter and Mike Bidochka from Brock’s Department of Biological Sciences were instrumental in the development of a newly published “made-in-Canada” biology textbook along with two other professors from the University of Toronto, Scarborough.

Publisher McGraw-Hill Ryerson held an official launch for Biology Canadian Edition last week at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto.

“There are dozens of American introductory biology textbooks being used in universities all across Canada,” says Hunter. “However, this book includes many examples of Canadians’ contributions to discoveries in biology, which we hope will motivate students to see themselves as ‘scientists in training’.”

“The Canadian edition of this popular book features more of the type of content requested by educators,” says Bidochka. “The book features interviews with Canadian scientists, topical discussion around Canadian research in the field and it also has an extensive interactive component.”

Professor Hunter is a medical entomologist and an international leader in biting fly research. She is one of the few remaining medical entomologists in Canada. Areas of interest include the behavioural ecology of black flies, the chromosomal systematics of black flies and West Nile virus mosquito surveillance.

Professor Bidochka is a molecular biologist and registered microbiologist who looks at insect-pathogen interactions, assessing virulence factors. His lab focuses on obtaining knowledge on the basic biology and molecular genetics of insect pathogenic fungi so that they might be used more effectively for biocontrol.

Both professors have worked with the internationally renowned Edinburgh Malaria Research Group at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. They have both conducted work in areas related to malaria transmission and malaria control.

Biology Canadian Edition

Biology Canadian Edition