Researchers - Faculty of Social Sciences

Jack and Nora Canadian Centre for Lifespan Development Research

Researchers - Faculty of Social Sciences

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Karen Arnell

Dr. Arnell is a cognitive psychologist who studies attentional limitations in dual-task situations, in particular an effect known as the attentional blink. She uses both behavioural response measures and event-related electrical brain potentials to examine the nature of attentional limitations in normal healthy brains. She is also interested in how the emotional impact of a stimulus can alter normal attentional functioning in dual-task paradigms.

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Mike Ashton

Dr. Ashton studies the differences among individuals in their psychological characteristics.  Much of his research is aimed at finding a few basic personality traits that can summarize the wide variety of personalities that people have, and at measuring those traits more accurately.  Other research by Dr. Ashton has focused on methods of measuring personality, on the role of personality in predicting behaviour, and on the relations of personality traits with mental abilities and with political attitudes.

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Kathy Belicki

Dr. Belicki is a clinical psychologist studying the impact of childhood trauma and abuse on adult functioning. This led to her current interest: The study of forgiveness and forgiveness-seeking. Dr.Belicki's research includes the study of personality & situational factors in forgiveness and forgiveness-seeking, motivations for forgiving or seeking forgiveness, as well as the relation to well-being of forgiveness and forgiveness-seeking.

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Tony Bogaert

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Angela Book

Broadly, I am interested in the area of Forensic Psychology. More specifically, my research interests focus on psychopathy and its relationship with a number of variables that relate directly to victim selection. These variables include emotion perception, successful deception/manipulation, and accuracy of vulnerability judgments. Find more information here.

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Michael Busseri

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Heather Chalmers

Dr. Chalmers' primary research interest is adolescent gambling and related risk-taking behaviours. Her specific interests include resilience, gaining a better understanding of the development of gambling problems, the predictors of various levels of gambling involvement along the gambling continuum, and the risk and protective factors related to gambling. In addition, she is interested in gender differences related to participation in risk-taking behaviours and the decision-making processes of youth in risk-taking situations.

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Rosemary Condillac

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Kimberly Cote

Today, many people intentionally cut down on sleep in order to make more time in the day for work and social demands. In addition, many people experience sleep disorders that disrupt sleep onset, sleep maintenance, or sleep efficiency. In all of these cases, the sleeper is experiencing a type of partial sleep loss. You need not pull and all-nighter to feel the ill effects on the next day! It is important to understand the extent of neurophysiological impairment resulting from this degree of sleep loss and the corresponding effect on daytime performance. This has widespread implications for work and scholastic performance, driving safety, military operations, and quality of life.
In order to investigate this relationship between sleep and daytime functioning, I employ a host of measures, including behavioural, EEG and event-related potentials (ERPs), which complement one another in the investigation of brain function and human behaviour. ERPs may be used to investigate cognitive processes that are associated with changing levels of arousal, such as speed of processing and attention. Both EEG and ERPs may be recorded from multiple electrode sites across the scalp, providing a topographic picture or map of on-going brain activity.
This general approach allows for investigation of moment-to-moment changes in brain physiology and performance during varying levels of sleepiness. These methods allow me to investigate a number of fascinating questions. Current research projects in the laboratory include: daytime consequences of continuous sleep restriction; effects of sleep fragmentation on daytime functioning; brain processing during sleep onset in healthy adults and patients with insomnia; the role of sleep in memory consolidation; and the benefits of a daytime nap across the lifespan.

Find more information here.

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Andrew Dane

Dr. Dane's research interests centre around the study of aggression, victimization and antisocial behaviour in children and adolescents, with particular attention to differential predictors of proactive, reactive and relational subtypes of aggression, as well as distinctions between pure aggressors, pure victims and aggressive-victims. A major focus of his research is the interplay of parenting, peer factors, child temperament and social-cognitive biases in the development of these behavioural, social and emotional outcomes. The ultimate objective of this research is to delineate critical developmental pathways that might be amenable to intervention.

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Mohammed Dore

Dr Dore is an economist whose research interests include aspects of justice theory including impacts of the lifestyle of the current generation on future generations. These impacts stem from environmental degradation and especially global climate change. It includes the asymmetric distributional consequences of climate change on the rich and the poor. Climate Change is the most urgent and pressing public policy issue of this century which will affect the young as well as the old. To cope with this challenge, major changes in the lifestyles of the affluent will be required in the advanced industrialized countries, coupled with the equitable treatment of the poor in developing countries.

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Veena Dwivedi

Dr. Dwivedi is a neurolinguist who studies the neurocognition of  language, examining how the healthy brain comprehends language in real time.  Her research examines how the brain understands the meaning of words and sentences in particular contexts by investigating electrophysiological responses (EEG) to language processing.   This comprehension requires using information from our real-world experience as well as the grammar of our particular language.  Identifying these different sources of information, and how they interact during normal linguistic processing, is important for interpreting and treating clinical language disorders, as well as explaining changes in how the brain perceives language as it ages.

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Stephen Emrich

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Angela Evans

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Maurice Feldman

Dr. Feldman is a scientist-practitioner with expertise in child maltreatment, parenting, behaviour disorders, autism and developmental disabilities. He is a leading expert in parenting by persons with intellectual disabilities, having designed and scientifically validated a parent education program emulated worldwide. He is Director of the Centre for Applied Disability Studies which offers specialization in Applied Behaviour Analysis. Currently, he is co-Principal Investigator (with Frances Owen) of the 3Rs Human Rights Training Project for Persons with intellectual disabilities.  Dr. Feldman is editor of Early Intervention: The Essential Readings, and co-editor of a forthcoming series on Appropriate Practice for Persons with Developmental Disabilities Who Have Mental Health Needs.

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Jan Frijters

Dr. Frijters is an applied developmental psychologist with an interest in the interface between academic skills and non-cognitive determinants of skill growth. This work extends into the area of learning disabilities, investigating how children's motivation, self-regulatory skills and alliance with remedial teachers help them benefit from remedial reading instruction. Conducted at the Hospital for Sick Children within the Learning Disabilities Reading Project, this work is part of ongoing collaboration with school boards throughout Ontario and academic partners in the U.S. Dr. Frijters also has a passion for quantitative research methods, especially for techniques such as multilevel modeling, person-centered, and structural approaches that can help sort out how developmental processes unfold over time and within specific learning contexts.

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Dawn Good

Dr. Good is a clinical neuropsychologist whose research is on how processing constraints involved in cognition, reasoning, and memory ability impact community living and daily function in neurologically compromised individuals, with the goal of improving currently   inadequate indices of cognitive reasoning and executive function. Of special interest are such influences on applied, practical and functional abilities, e.g., predictors for decision making, social competency and development of relationships, ability to live independently and successfully in the community.   In addition, her   research is focused on understanding the current education base of   professionals who work with individuals who have neurological   compromise in practical settings - educational systems, rehabilitation settings, community integration - and then identifying strategies and the means of applying these techniques to improve the ability for professionals to more successfully address the needs and required services of persons with neurological challenges. Dr. Good regularly co-teaches the internationally renowned neuropsychology training program sponsored by Brock University and the Ontario Brain Injury Association.

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Dorothy Griffiths

Dr. Griffiths has extensive experience in working on clinical issues regarding dual diagnosis (persons who are developmentally disabled and have mental health issues). Her specific expertise is in the area of sexual abuse and offence, aggression and self-injury, and social skills training with persons with developmental disabilities. She is currently researching Human Rights and persons with intellectual disabilities. Dr. Griffiths is notably recognized for her books Changing Sexually Inappropriate Behavior, Dual Diagnosis, Demystifying Syndromes, and Ethical Dilemmas of Sexuality and Developmental Disabilities.

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Carolyn Hafer

My primary research area is the social psychology of justice. I am particularly interested in the concept of the belief in a just world (i.e., the belief that people get what they deserve). Previous research has examined the implications of this belief for observers' reactions to innocent victims. I have expanded on this work in several ways. First, I have investigated how the belief in a just world affects perceptions of and responses to one's own misfortune rather than the misfortune of others. I have also investigated the function that this belief might play in daily life. Finally, I have tried to show evidence that it is specifically the injustice of innocent suffering that leads to defensive responses to innocent victims (and not, for example, simply the presence of negative outcomes). I am continuing to conduct research on these and related issues.
I have also done some work recently on the notion of scope of justice, or the boundary within which justice is seen as applicable. For example, my colleagues and I are attempting to apply new methodologies to answer the question, When and for what target groups is justice a relevant consideration in social interaction? Finally, I am interested in the predictors of social action as well as the reasons for inaction in the face of injustice.

Find more information here.

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Gordon Hodson

Dr. Hodson is a social psychologist who examines intergroup relations, with an emphasis on stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. He focuses particularly on how individual differences and personality relate to social exclusion.  His research typically explores the multifarious precursors of prejudice, including both cognitive (e.g., group representations) and emotional (e.g., anxiety, disgust, empathy) factors.  Recent research has focused on methods to improve intergroup attitudes and relations.

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Heather Lawford

 

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Mike Maniaci

 

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Zopito Marini

Zopito A. Marini, Ph.D., is a developmental psychologist, and a full Professor of Child and Youth Studies. His research interests focus on the area generally known as sociocognitive development. Dr. Marini does research, writes and lectures on issues related to family and school conflicts, bullying and victimization, the development of self-regulation and civility.

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Voula Marinos

Dr. Marinos has research experience in the areas of crime, and sentencing and punishment for both young and adult offenders in Canada. Her expertise is specifically in the area of non-custodial punishments, public attitudes towards sentencing and punishment, and reforming the sentencing process. Her research work stems from a multidisciplinary perspective on crime and her studies in criminology, sociology, and law. Her co-authored book is entitled Youth Crime and the Youth Justice System in Canada: A Research Perspective.

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Tanya Martini

Dr. Martini’s research interests centre on the social and cognitive aspects of parent-child relationships across the lifespan (e.g., feelings of control within the relationship, perspective taking abilities, goals that are pursued when interacting with the other person and attributions that are made about their actions). More recently, she has also investigated how emotion affects the quality of parent-child relationships, with particular emphasis on the expression and control of emotions, and meta emotional philosophy (i.e., our thoughts and feelings about particular emotions - for example, do you think that anger is destructive and do you feel upset when it is expressed, or do you think that it is healthy to express anger, and not feel bothered by such displays?). For the most part, Dr. Martini has focused on how these variables are associated with the quality of older parent-adult child relationships and children’s social and emotional development.

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Cheryl McCormick

Dr. McCormick is a developmental psychobiologist and neuroscientist who focuses on the effects of stress and sex hormones on brain development. Although there is ample evidence of gender differences in psychopathology (e.g., more men use drugs but women who use drugs are more likely to become abusers; more women than men suffer from mood disorders, etc.), most clinical and preclinical research has focused on males only.  Dr. McCormick’s research has shown that the evidence obtained from one sex does not readily translate to the other. Currently, her primary research focus involves the use of animal models to investigate the extent to which stressors modify ongoing brain development over adolescence and potentially render the individual more susceptible to drug abuse and mood disorders.  She also investigates the mechanisms that underlie the sex-specific effects of stressors.  Dr. McCormick is a Canada Research Chair in Behavioural Neuroscience.

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John McNamara

Dr. McNamara is an educational psychologist interested in studying the developmental health of children and youth with learning disabilities. Currently his research involves working with the Kindergarten Screening Project. This project includes 3 school divisions and a research team who are working to develop and implement an assessment tool to identify young children who are at-risk for reading failure in kindergarten. Other areas of research include neurological and environmental risk and protective factors associated with dyslexia and developmental health of children with reading disabilities.

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Danielle Molnar

 

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Cathy Mondloch

Dr. Mondloch’s research interests centre on the development of various aspects of face processing and the role of early experience in mediating that development. Faces convey a wealth of information in our daily social interactions - information about the identity of individuals, their emotions, their gender and race, their direction of gaze. Her research program involves developing tasks that tap various components of face processing in adults and then adapting those tasks in order to test infants and children. These tasks allow her research team to answer a variety of questions: how sensitive are children to various emotional expressions? To what extent does our perception of emotional expressions depend on other facial characteristics (e.g., race, direction of eye gaze)? How do social categories affect face recognition and perceptions of facial attractiveness? She investigates the specificity of results by testing children and adults with a variety of stimuli in addition to human faces (e.g., hierarchical shapes, monkey faces, and ambiguous patterns).

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Cam Muir

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Tim Murphy

Dr. Murphy examines how sleepiness alters brain function and people's performance during both simple and more challenging tasks. His recent research has looked at unintentional sleep onset (falling asleep while intending to remain awake) and several electrocortical indices of brain functioning during 20 hours of sleep deprivation and how they relate to behavioural performance. Other projects he has currently involved with include investigating when we become consciously aware of errors and the effect of sleep deprivation on risk assessment as measure through a gambling task.

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Frances Owen

Dr. Owen is a psychologist working on issues related to the interface between organizational systems and clinical practice in children's mental and services for people who have intellectual disabilities.  Currently, she is working with colleagues on systemic approaches to the teaching and support of human rights for persons with intellectual disabilities. She also investigates the nature of resource allocation and service access in families of preschool children who have communication delays. Her interest in organizational issues includes a focus on ways to prepare professionals for the world of work. She has co-authored books in the areas of organizational behaviour and management, co-edited a book on issues related to the human rights of people with intellectual disabilities and has co-authored articles articles related to counsellor training, abuse prevention and human rights promotion in persons with intellectual disabilities.

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Rebecca Raby

My research draws on post-structural and critical theories to examine the  childhood and adolescences, particularly how they are experienced by children and adolescents themselves and how they are intersected by gender, race, class and sexuality. My research interests include: discourses of childhood and adolescence, their effects and contradictions; teenagers' experiences and perceptions of adolescence; gender, race, class and sexual orientation as they intersect in the lives of young people; theorizing resistance and rights; the discipline, governance and regulation of youth; young people's agency and participation; gender and sexuality in childhood and youth; global childhood; and social inequality.

I have recently completed a SSHRC-funded investigation of secondary school dress and discipline codes: how the language they use produces certain assumptions about young people and ideal workers, how they are applied by staff, and how they are received and negotiated by students. My more recent SSHRC-funded study (with Shauna Pomerantz) school is entitled, "Smart Girls: Negotiating Academic Success in a 'Post-Feminist' Era and examines the intersections between gender and high academic achievment in high school. As well as being a faculty member in CHYS, I am also a member of the MA Program in Social Justice and Equity Studies, and on the Faculty Steering Committee of the Social Justice Research Institute.

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Linda Rose-Krasnor

The overall direction of Dr. Rose-Krasnor’s research program is to understand the development of social competence in children and youth, with a special interest in the role of youth engagement in the development of social competence and adjustment, especially among socially withdrawn youth. She is a co-investigator in a large longitudinal study of activity involvement of young children, as well as studies of teachers’, coaches’ and activity leaders’ views of shyness. In addition, she is involved in studies focused on better understanding the process of youth involvement and strategies for promoting greater youth engagement in activities and organizations.

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Sid Segalowitz

Dr. Segalowitz is a developmental psychologist and neuroscientist, integrating different theoretical approaches in the study of the child. His research paradigm uses electrical brain wave patterns (EEG) to study how the brain responds to attention demands and thinking challenges. His developmental work includes the Oh no! response (the brain's reaction to realizing that one is about to make an error), its development across childhood, and how it relates to an individual's personality, such as the propensity to take risks, especially in late adolescence.  He is also currently examining how the brain responds to visual information, such as geometric stimuli, faces and reading words, and how this can be influenced by early experiences. Other collaborations include work on adult aging using psychophysiolgical methods to examine attentional control.  Dr. Segalowitz is currently Editor of the journal Brain and Cognition, and his latest book is Developmental Psychophysiology (Cambridge University Press).

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Christine Tardif-Williams

Dr. Tardif-Williams is a developmental psychologist whose main research examines parent-child interactions and communication, with a particular emphasis on adolescent conflict and independence. Her other research interests include social-emotional development across the lifespan, the influence of changing cultural contexts on parent-child communication, and research methodology, all of which reflect her background in cognitive and developmental psychology. Dr. Tardif-Williams is currently involved in two research projects, one that explores the impact of acculturation disparity on the quality of communication among Chinese-Canadian immigrant mothers and their children and one that examines the impact of various methodologies (e.g., role-playing, drama, interactive technology) in educating individuals who have intellectual disabilities (and their family members) about their human rights, respect and responsibilities. Dr. Tardif-Williams also chairs the organizing committee for the annual Niagara Parenting Conference.

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Donato Tarulli

Dr. Tarulli is a developmental psychologist with interests in the social and cultural foundations of child and youth development. His recent work draws on dialogical, hermeneutic, and narrative frameworks that emphasize the interplay of cultural tools and individual agency in the formation of identity. Dr. Tarulli has used this multi-disciplinary framework for examining a variety of topics, including children's play, private speech, child rights, and intellectual disabilities.

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Ayda Tekok-Kilic

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Tricia Vause

Dr. Vause has completed her doctorate in clinical psychology, and works in behavioral assessment and intervention for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, and at-risk pediatric populations (e.g., stress and emotional disorders). Her research interests lie in the areas of intensive behavioral intervention, discrimination learning, and treating obsessive compulsive disorder in children and youth with high functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome.

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Tony Volk

Dr. Volk is an evolutionary developmental psychologist interested in parenting.  His broad goal is to understand how parents and children influence each other.  His current work is split between infants and adolescents.  His infant work focuses on how infant and child faces influence adults' reactions to them.  His adolescent research focuses on aggression (bullying/psychopathy) and athletics, with an emphasis on how parents can influence both.

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Rebecca Ward

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Teena Willoughby

Dr. Willoughby is a developmental psychologist.  Her research primarily concerns adolescent resilience, particularly with regard to academic underachievement, risk behaviours, optimal experiences, and media/technology influences on lifestyle choices. A better understanding of resilience could suggest how and why lowered achievement and risk behaviours persist and escalate among some adolescents, but decrease and discontinue among others. The goal of her research program is to examine the relation between developmental pathways and protective factors that promote and strengthen adolescent well-being. Another research thrust concerns the impact of technology-based environments on social interaction and learning.  Dr. Willoughby is the Director of the Brock Research Institute for Youth Studies.

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Dawn Zinga

Dr. Zinga is a cognitive-developmental psychologist whose research focuses on the accommodation of culture within educational settings and children's rights within educational contexts. Her work has focused on examining how children and adolescents conceptualize and perceive their educational experiences within the context of culture and children's rights. She is particularly interested in aboriginal education issues, multiculturalism within education, and cyber-bullying. Dr. Zinga is involved in several major research projects that include: “The Student Success Research Consortium Project ” - a collaborative aboriginal research initiative, “Welcoming communities: Working to improve the inclusion of visible minorities and immigrants in second and third tier Ontario cities” CURA project, and collaboration with Dr. Shaheen Shariff's cyber-bullying research program.