WORKS

POETRY

The Lost Island. Vancouver: Simply Read Books, 2004.

North American Indian Silver Craft. Vancouver: Subway Books, 2004.

I May Not Go. music by Jeff Smallman. Hensall, ON: Lighthouse Music Publications, 2003.

The Song My Paddle Sings. music by Ruth Watson Henderson. Don Mills, ON: G.V. Thompson Music, 1994.

Legends of Siwash Rock. Vancouver: Vancouver Business and Professional Women's Club, 1952.

The Moccassin Maker. Toronto: William Briggs, 1913.

The Shagganappi. Toronto: William Briggs, 1913.

Flint and Feather. Toronto: Musson, 1912.

Canadian Born. 1903.

In The Shadows. Gouverneur, NY: Adirondack, 1898.

The White Wampum. Toronto: Copp, Clark, 1895.

The Legend of the Salt-Chuck Oluk. Vancouver: s.n., 189?.

EDITED COLLECTIONS

Gerson, Carole and Veronica Strong-Boag, eds. Tekahionwake: Collected Poems and Selected Prose. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2002.

Watts-Dunton, Theodore, ed. Flint and Feather: The Complete Poems of E. Pauline Johnson. Toronto: Musson Book Co., 1917.

Van Steen, Marcus, ed. Pauline Johnson, Her Life and Work: Biography Written By and Poems Selected By Marcus Van Steen. Toronto: Hodder and Stoughton, 1965.

OTHER WRITING

Legends of Vancouver. Toronto: McClelland & Goodchild, 1911.

CRITICISM

Calverley, David. Rev. of Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake). Veronica Strong-Boag and Carole Gerson, eds. Ontario History 93.1 (2001): 94-95.

Collett, Anne. “E. Pauline Johnson Tekahionwake: Mistress of Her Craft.” Kunapipi: Journal of Post-Colonial Writing 23.1 (2001): 130-133.

Collett. Anne. “Miss E. Pauline Johnson Tekahionwake and the Other Woman.” Women’s Writing 8.3 (2001): 359-373.

Crate, Joan. “Pale as Real Ladies: Poems for Pauline Johnson.” Canadian Literature 145 (1995): 129-131.

Curtis, Andrea. Rev. of Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake). Veronica Strong-Boag and Carole Gerson, eds. Toronto Life 34.12 (2000): 44.

Devereux, Cecily. Rev. of The Moccassin Maker, by Pauline Johnson. Canadian Literature 168 (2001): 162-163.

Fiamengo, Janice. “Reconsidering Pauline.” Rev. of Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake). Veronica Strong-Boag and Carole Gerson, eds. Canadian Literature 167 (2000): 174-176.

Gerson, Carole. “‘The Most Canadian of All Canadian Poets’: Pauline Johnson and the Construction of a National Literature.” Canadian Literature 158 (1998): 90-107.

Gerson, Carole. “Recuperating from Modernism: Pauline Johnson's Challenge to Literary History.” Women and Literary History:For There She Was.’ Eds. Katherine Binhammer, Jeanne Wood, Susan Brown, Patricia Clements and Isobel Grundy. Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press, 2003. 167-186.

Gerson, Carole. Rev. of The Moccassin Maker, by Pauline Johnson. Books in Canada 28.3 (1999): 34.

Givener, Joan. Rev. of Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake). Veronica Strong-Boag and Carole Gerson, eds. Quill & Quire 66.6 (2000): 46.

Golke, Darlene. Rev. of Pauline Johnson: First Aboriginal Voices of Canada, by Betty Keller. Canadian Review of Materials 6.18 (2000).

Gray, Charlotte. “Buckskin in Belgravia: Pauline Johnson Invents the Author’s Tour.” Literary Review of Canada 10.8 (2002): 14-17.

Gray, Charlotte. Flint and Feather: The Life and Times of E. Pauline Johnson, Tekahionwake. Toronto: HarperFlamingo, 2002.

Hoefel, Roseanne. “Writing, Performance, Activism: Zitkala-Sa and Pauline Johnson.” Native American Women in Literature and Culture. Eds. Susan Castillo and Victor M.P. Da Rosa. Porto, Portugal: Fernando Pessoa University Press, 1997. 107-118.

Hulan, Shelley. Rev. of Buckskin & Broadcloth: A Celebration of E. Pauline Johnson Tekahionwake 1861-1913, by Sheila Johnston. Canadian Poetry 44 (1999): 85-100.

Johnston, Sheila. Buckskin & Broadcloth: A Celebration of E. Pauline Johnson Tekahionwake 1861-1913. Toronto: Natural Heritage/ Natural History, 1997.

Keller, Betty. Pauline: A Biography of Pauline Johnson. Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre, 1981.

Keller, Betty. Pauline Johnson: First Aboriginal Voices of Canada. Montreal: XYZ Publishing, 1999.

Lane, Richard J. “The Dangers of ‘Dumb Tall’: Eurocentric Translations of the Potlach.” Commonwealth Essays and Studies 21.2 (1999): 75-82.

Leighton, Mary Elizabeth. “‘By Pen and Platform’: The Cultural Work of Pauline Johnson.” Rev. of Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake). Veronica Strong-Boag and Carole Gerson, eds. Essays on Canadian Writing 72 (2000): 202-207.

Leighton, Mary Elizabeth. “Performing Pauline Johnson: Representations of ‘the Indian Poetess’ in the Periodical Press, 1892-1895.” Essays on Canadian Writing 65 (1998): 141-164.

Lyon, George W. “Pauline Johnson: A Reconsideration.” Studies in Canadian Literature 15.2 (1990): 136-159.

McConney, Denise S. Rev. of Buckskin & Broadcloth: A Celebration of E. Pauline Johnson Tekahionwake 1861-1913, by Sheila Johnston. Theatre Research in Canada 20.2 (1999): 265-268.

McRaye, Walter. Pauline Johnson and Her Friends. Toronto: Ryerson, 1947.

Milz, Sabine. “‘Publica(c)tion’: E. Pauline Johnson’s Publishing Venues and Their Contemporary Significance.” Studies in Canadian Literature 29.1 (2004): 127-145.

Monture, Rick. “‘Beneath the British Flag’: Iroquois and Canadian Nationalism in the Work of Pauline Johnson and Duncan Campbell Scott.” Essays on Canadian Writing 75 (2002): 118-141.

Panofsky, Ruth. Rev. of Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake). Veronica Strong-Boag and Carole Gerson, eds. Papers of the Bibliographic Society of Canada 38.2 (2000): 106-108.

Pichora, Anne. “Chasing Pauline: The Perils of Biographical Research.” Bulletin 33.3 (2001): 18-19.

Rak, Julie. “Double-wampum, Double-life, Double-click: E. Pauline Johnson by and for the World Wide Web.” Textual Studies in Canada 13/14 (2001): 153-170.

Rose, Marilyn J. “Pauline Johnson: New World Poet.” British Journal of Canadian Studies 12.2 (1997): 298-308.

Ruoff, A. LaVonne Brown. “Early Native American Women Authors: Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, Sarah Winnemucca, S. Alice Callahan, E. Pauline Johnson, and Zitkala-Sa.” Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers: A Critical Reader. Ed. Karen L. Kilcup. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1998. 81-111.

Ruoff, A. La Vonne Brown. “Justice for Indians and Women: The Protest Fiction of Alice Callahan and Pauline Johnson.” World Literature Today 66.2 (1992): 249-255.

Rymhs, Deena. “But the Shadow of Her Story: Narrative Unsettlement, Self-Inscription, and the Translation in Pauline Johnson’s Legends of Vancouver.” Studies in American Indian Literatures 13.4 (2001): 51-78.

Schiedel, Bonnie. “Gray’s Anatomy of 19th-Century Canada.” Rev. of Flint and Feather: The Life and Times of E. Pauline Johnson, Tekahionwake, by Charlotte Gray. Quill & Quire 68.9 (2002): 15.

Soderstrom, Mary. Rev. of Flint and Feather: The Life and Times of E. Pauline Johnson, Tekahionwake, by Charlotte Gray. Quill & Quire 68.8 (2002): 27.

Strong-Boag, Veronica and Carole Gerson, eds. Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson Tekahionwake. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press, 2000.

Strong-Boag, Veronica.“‘A people akin to mine’: Indians and Highlanders Within the British Empire.” Native Studies Review 14.1 (2001): 27-53.

Taillon, Joan. Rev. of Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake). Veronica Strong-Boag and Carole Gerson, eds. Windspeaker 18.5 (2000): 18.

Unwin, Peter. “The Mohawk Princess.” The Beaver 79.5 (1999): 15-21.

Van Steen, Marcus. Pauline Johnson, Her Life and Work. Toronto: Musson, 1965.

Willmott, Glenn. “Paddled By Pauline.” Canadian Poetry 46 (2000): 43-68.

York, Lorraine. “‘Your Star’: Pauline Johnson and the Tensions of Celebrity Discourse.” Canadian Poetry 51 (2002): 8-17.

DISSERTATIONS

Aigner-Varoz, Erika E. “Suiting Herself: E. Pauline Johnson’s Constructions of Indian Identity and Self.” Dissertation. University of New Mexico, 2001.

Marshall, Christine Lowella. “The Re-Presented Indian: Pauline Johnson’s ‘Strong Race Opinion’ and Other Forgotten Discourses.” Dissertation. University of Arizona, 1997.

Power, John. “First Impressions: Reconstructing Language and Identity in Pauling Johnson’s ‘The Cattle Thief,’ Jeanette Armstrong’s ‘Indian Woman,’ and Beth Cuthland’s ‘Post-Oka Kinda Woman.’” Thesis. Lakehead University, 2004.

BIOGRAPHY

Emily Pauline Johnson was born on the Six Nations Reserve near Brantord, Ontario, on March 10 of 1861. Johnson also used the Mohawk name Tekahionwake: her father was a Mohawk Native-Canadian, and her mother was English. Pauline Johnson was well known for her poetry performaces, which she gave across Canada in an attempt to raise money to support her writing. She began her popular performances in an English ball gown, and would break half-way through the night to transform herself into an Indian princess, wearing a costume of skins, scalps, and a hunting knife. Johnson was the first Native poet to be published in Canada. She died of breat cancer in March of 1913, at the age of 52. She is the only person to have ever been buried in Vancouver's Stanley Park, and today, a monument to her life and work exists at her grave site.

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