Thomasís Courses at the University of Chicago

This document summarizes Thomas's announced teaching schedule from the time of his arrival at the University of Chicago, in the summer term of 1893 to the spring term of 1918, as presented in the University of Chicago's Annual Register, 1892-93 through 1817-18. Regrettably, course descriptions were not included in Annual Register after 1916. We believe --- but have not confirmed --- that they may be preserved in the University's quarterly Announcements.

The shortcoming of this approach to determining actual courses delivered, of course, is that a course scheduled does not necessarily mean a course delivered. The schedule can be validated against the University's archive of "Instructor Grade Reports," the "grades-turned-in" by a course's instructor. Part of that work was carried out by the University of Chicago archivists for Rudolph Haerle's.[1] He was able to confirm that courses in 1911 were not taught because of Thomas' third trip to Europe, the first carried out with the support of the Helen Culver Fund for Race Psychology. He was able to confirm that the scheduled courses between 1908 and the end of 1917 were taught. The courses from the Spring quarter of 1918 were cancelled by the University Administration. We have identified each known misfit between plan and reality with "Course not taught"..

We have not yet confirmed which of the scheduled courses were taught prior in the period prior to 1908 against the Instructor Grade Reports. As a result, the schedule presented here for the period between the Summer Quarter of 1893 and 1908 can only be considered a tentative calendar for Thomas schedule.

Year Quarter Course & Description
1893 Winter Not an instructor
  Spring Not an instructor
  Summer 30. The Historical Sociologies. — Exposition of significant classical, mediaeval and modern attempts to interpret social phenomena. Criticism of data, methods and conclusions. 4 DM.
  Autumn [Not scheduled to teach]
1894 Winter [Not scheduled to teach]
  Spring [Not scheduled to teach]
  Summer 30. The Historical Sociologies. — Exposition of significant classical, mediaeval, and modern attempts to interpret social phenomena. Criticism of data, methods, and conclusions. DM.
  Autumn [Not scheduled to teach]
1895 Winter 30. The Historical Sociologies. — Exposition of significant classical, mediaeval, and modern attempts to interpret social phenomena. Criticism of data, methods, and conclusions. DM.
  Spring [Not scheduled to teach]
  Summer Synopsis of Comparative Psychology of the Human Races DM
    Synopsis of Somatic and Psychic History of Woman DM
  Autumn 41. Comparative Psychology of the Human Races. The nutritive, physical, reproductive, aesthetic, religious, political, juridical, and technological conditions of early society will be considered as factors of the psychical life of the social organism. The germs of psychic and social life will be sought in the subhuman species. 3DM.
    42. Somatic and Psychic History of Woman.— A study of woman in childhood, in maidenhood, in motherhood, in widowhood, in old age, and in death, among savage, barbarous, and civilized races, with reference to her somatic, psychic, and aesthetic organization, and in relation to her social status — economic, religious, political, legal, technological, and ceremonial. Somatic and psychic variations due to sex, mutilation and artificial deformation, sex and marriage customs, sexual and natural selection, and the pathological relations of woman to society — marriage of near of kin, prostitution, crime, insanity, suicide — will have special attention, and the measure and kind of woman's service as a social stimulus will appear. 2DM
1896 Winter 41. Comparative Psychology of the Human Races. The nutritive, physical, reproductive, aesthetic, religious, political, juridical, and technological conditions of early society will be considered as factors of the psychical life of the social organism. The germs of psychic and social life will be sought in the subhuman species. 3DM.
    42. Somatic and Psychic History of Woman.— A study of woman in childhood, in maidenhood, in motherhood, in widowhood, in old age, and in death, among savage, barbarous, and civilized races, with reference to her somatic, psychic, and aesthetic organization, and in relation to her social status — economic, religious, political, legal, technological, and ceremonial. Somatic and psychic variations due to sex, mutilation and artificial deformation, sex and marriage customs, sexual and natural selection, and the pathological relations of woman to society — marriage of near of kin, prostitution, crime, insanity, suicide — will have special attention, and the measure and kind of woman's service as a social stimulus will appear. 2DM
  Spring 41. Comparative Psychology of the Human Races. The nutritive, physical, reproductive, aesthetic, religious, political, juridical, and technological conditions of early society will be considered as factors of the psychical life of the social organism. The germs of psychic and social life will be sought in the subhuman species. 3DM. [not taught, Thomas traveling in Europe]
    43. Primitive Art. —The origin of the aesthetic sense, and its developmental relation to social consciousness. A comparative study of mutilation, artificial deformation, tattooing, dress, ornament, painting, poetry, the dance, music, sculpture, architecture, technology, sport, and ceremonial, with reference to the aesthetic content. Ideals of beauty among different races will be compared, and the theory of sexual selection will be examined in its aesthetic bearings. DM [not taught, Thomas traveling in Europe]
  Summer [Not scheduled to teach] 
  Autumn 26. Folk-psychology — The development of race-consciousness and of social control, in connection with the nutritive, somatic, reproductive, animistic, ecclesiastical, technological, juridical, and political conditions and institutions of primitive and early society. Based mainly on ethnological materials. Introductory to general sociology and to the more special courses in folk-psychology. Recommended to students in psychology, history and political science who wish to elect work in this department. Primarily for graduates, and elective in the Autumn quarter to seniors who have had work in anthropology, sociology, psychology. Required in the Spring Quarter, in continuation of Courses 72, 73, of all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who present sociology either as primary or secondary subject.
    30. Sex in Folk-Psychology. — The relation of the reproductive process to social evolution, and the measure and kind of woman's service as a social stimulus. A study of woman among savage and barbarous races, with reference to her somatic, psychic and aesthetic organization, and in relation to her social status — economic, religious, political, legal, technological, and ceremonial. Somatic and psychic variations due to sex and marriage customs, sexual selection, and the pathological relations of woman to society — marriage of next of kin, crime, insanity, suicide — will have special attention. Mj.
1897 Winter 31. Sex in Folk-Psychology. — Continuation of Course 30. Woman under early Asiatic, Egyptian and European civilizations, with especial treatment of status under monasticism and feudalism, and of her relation to the renaissance. Mj
    24. Primitive Art — Comparative study of mutilation, artificial deformation, tattoing, dress ornament, painting, poetry, the dance, music, sculpture, architecture, technology, sport and ceremonial, with reference to their aesthetic content. Ideals of beauty among different races will be compared, and the adequacy of the theory of sexual selection to explain the origin of the aesthetic sense will be examined. Mj
  Spring 26. Folk-psychology — The development of race-consciousness and of social control, in connection with the nutritive, somatic, reproductive, animistic, ecclesiastical, technological, juridical, and political conditions and institutions of primitive and early society. Based mainly on ethnological materials. Introductory to general sociology and to the more special courses in folk-psychology. Recommended to students in psychology, history and political science who wish to elect work in this department. Primarily for graduates, and elective in the Autumn quarter to seniors who have had work in anthropology, sociology, psychology. Required in the Spring Quarter, in continuation of Courses 72, 73, of all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who present sociology either as primary or secondary subject.
    29. The Child in Folk-Psychology. Mj.
    32. Primitive Art.— Research course.
  Summer 26. Folk Psychology.— A study of primitive social coordinations, designed to exhibit the general laws of association and control as they appear among the natural races, and to trace the progressive modifications of social forms and activities under the operation of physical, somatic, and psychic forces. Anthropological and ethnological basis of sociology. Elective in the Autumn quarter to Seniors, and required in the Spring Quarter, in continuance of Courses 72 and 73, of all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who present sociology as either primary or secondary subject. Mj.
    71. An Introduction to the Study of Society.— This course is designed to afford a synthetic view of social phenomena, and to suggest a preliminary way of looking at society. It should serve as an introduction to the special social sciences of economics, political science, etc. The method is concrete and illustrative throughout. Open to Junior and Senior College students. Mj.
  Autumn 26. Folk Psychology.— A study of primitive social coordinations, designed to exhibit the general laws of association and control as they appear among the natural races, and to trace the progressive modifications of social forms and activities under the operation of physical, somatic, and psychic forces. Anthropological and ethnological basis of sociology. Elective in the Autumn quarter to Seniors, and required in the Spring Quarter, in continuance of Courses 72 and 73, of all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who present sociology as either primary or secondary subject. Mj.
    30. Primitive Social Control. — A study of authority and imitation as expressed in primitive juridical and political systems and in social convention. Family, clan, tribal and military organization, the maternal and paternal systems, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine men and priests, caste, blood vengeance, salutations, gifts, tribute, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceana, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
1898 Winter 28. The Social Psychology of Sex. —  The relation of primitive association and social organization to the fact of sex. The economic, political, legal, technological and ceremonial status of women, in natural and civilized races. Somatic, psychic, and aesthetic variations due to sex; sex and marriage customs ; sex selection ; the pathological relations of woman to society (insanity, crime, suicide); and an estimate of her relative fitness for participation in various forms of social activity. For the Graduate Schools.
    30. Primitive Social Control. — A study of authority and imitation as expressed in primitive juridical and political systems and in social convention. Family, clan, tribal and military organization, the maternal and paternal systems, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine men and priests, caste, blood vengeance, saluations, gifts, tribute, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceana, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
  Spring 24. The Social Psychology of Art and Amusement. — Preliminary examination of the phenomena of irritability in lower life forms. Race development of the emotions. Mutilation, artificial deformations, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor in tribal society, with reference to their aesthetic content.. The developmental relations of emotion and aesthetic activity to other forms of race activity and consciousness, and an estimate of the social value of art. For the Graduate Schools. Mj.
  ???? 29. The Social Psychology of Art and Amusement. — Mj. '98-99. Research course.
    26. Folk Psychology.— A study of primitive social coordinations, designed to exhibit the general laws of association and control as they appear among the natural races, and to trace the progressive modifications of social forms and activities under the operation of physical, somatic, and psychic forces. Anthropological and ethnological basis of sociology. Elective in the Autumn quarter to Seniors, and required in the Spring Quarter, in continuance of Courses 72 and 73, of all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who present sociology as either primary or secondary subject. Mj.
  Summer 30. Primitive Social Control. — A study of authority and imitation as expressed in primitive juridical and political systems and in social convention. Family, clan, tribal and military organization, the maternal and paternal systems, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine men and priests, caste, blood vengeance, saluations, gifts, tribute, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceana, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
    71. An Introduction to the Study of Society.— This course is designed to afford a synthetic view of social phenomena, and to suggest a preliminary way of looking at society. It should serve as an introduction to the special social sciences of economics, political science, etc. The method is concrete and illustrative throughout. Open to Junior and Senior College students. Mj.
  Autumn 26. Folk Psychology.— A study of primitive social coordinations, designed to exhibit the general laws of association and control as they appear among the natural races, and to trace the progressive modifications of social forms and activities under the operation of physical, somatic, and psychic forces. Anthropological and ethnological basis of sociology. Elective in the Autumn quarter to Seniors, and required in the Spring Quarter, in continuance of Courses 72 and 73, of all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who present sociology as either primary or secondary subject. Mj.
    30. Primitive Social Control. — A study of authority and imitation as expressed in primitive juridical and political systems and in social convention. Family, clan, tribal and military organization, the maternal and paternal systems, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine men and priests, caste, blood vengeance, saluations, gifts, tribute, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceana, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
1899 Winter 27. The Primitive Social Mind. — The conscious organization of habit in the tribal stage. Relation of the psychic life in the group to the group activities, and of both to the geographical environment. Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. Educational meaning of initiation, secret societies, and tapu. Animistic beliefs and practices, and the influence of analogy, suggestion, and hypnotism in the formation of mind. Language and number. The psychology of social approval and disapproval in connection with early forms of offense and punishment. Analysis of the content of consciousness and comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes, and and judgment of the nature of the psychic interval between the natural and the cultural races For graduate students. Mj.
    28. Sex in Folk Psychology. — The relation of association and social organization to the fact of sex. Somatic, psychic, and aesthetic variations due to sex, and the expression of the characteristic differences of the two sexes in the structure and activities of early society. Woman in childhood, in maidenhood, in motherhood, in widowhood, in old age, and in death among the natural races, with reference to her economic, religious, political, legal, technological and ceremonial status. Sex and marriage customs. The relation of sex to insanity, crime and suicide. Mj.  Prerequisite : Course 26, 27, or 30.
  Spring 24. Ethnological Aesthetic. — Preliminary examination of the phenomena of irritability in lower life forms. Race development of the emotions.  Mutilation, artificial deformations, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor in tribal society. The developmental relations of emotion and aesthetic activity to other forms of race activity and consciousness, and an estimate of the social value of art. For graduate students. Mj.
    26. Folk Psychology.— A study of primitive social coordinations, designed to exhibit the general laws of association and control as they appear among the natural races, and to trace the progressive modifications of social forms and activities under the operation of physical, somatic, and psychic forces. Anthropological and ethnological basis of sociology. Elective in the Autumn quarter to Seniors, and required in the Spring Quarter, in continuance of Courses 72 and 73, of all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who present sociology as either primary or secondary subject. Mj.
  Summer 26. Race Psychology. A study of primitive social coordinations, designed to exhibit the general laws of association and control as they appear among the natural races, and to trace the progressive modifications of social forms and activities under the operation of physical, somatic, and psychic forces. Anthropological and ethnological basis of sociology. Elective in the Autumn quarter to Seniors, and required in the Spring Quarter, in continuance of Courses 72 and 73, of all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who present sociology as either primary or secondary subject.
    27. Race Development of Mind.— The conscious organization of habit in the tribal stage. Relation of the psychic life in the group to the group activities, and of both to the geographical environment. Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. Educational meaning of initiation, secret societies, and tapu. Animistic beliefs and practices, and the influence of analogy, suggestion, and hypnotism in the formation of mind. Language and number. The psychology of social approval and disapproval in connection with early forms of offense and punishment. Analysis of the content of consciousness and comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes, and and judgment of the nature of the psychic interval between the natural and the cultural races For graduate students. Mj.
  ???? 71. An Introduction to the Study of Society.— This course is designed to afford a synthetic view of social phenomena, and to suggest a preliminary way of looking at society. It should serve as an introduction to the special social sciences of economics, political science, etc. The method is concrete and illustrative throughout. Open to Junior and Senior College students. Mj.
  Autumn [Not scheduled to teach]
1900 Winter 24. The Art of the Natural Races. — With reference to the meaning of art in the social process. Race development of the emotions.  Mutilation, artificial deformations, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor in tribal society. The developmental relations of emotion and aesthetic activity to other forms of race activity and consciousness. Popular manifestations of art in Chicago. For graduate students. Mj.
    26. Race Psychology. A study of primitive social coordinations, designed to exhibit the general laws of association and control as they appear among the natural races, and to trace the progressive modifications of social forms and activities under the operation of physical, somatic, and psychic forces. Anthropological and ethnological basis of sociology. Elective in the Autumn quarter to Seniors, and required in the Spring Quarter, in continuance of Courses 72 and 73, of all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who present sociology as either primary or secondary subject. Mj.
  Spring 27. Race Development of Mind.— The conscious organization of habit in the tribal stage. Relation of the psychic life in the group to the group activities, and of both to the geographical environment. Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. Educational meaning of initiation, secret societies, and tapu. Animistic beliefs and practices, and the influence of analogy, suggestion, and hypnotism in the formation of mind. Language and number. The psychology of social approval and disapproval in connection with early forms of offense and punishment. A Analysis of the content of consciousness and comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes, and and judgment of the nature of the psychic interval between the natural and the cultural races For graduate students. Mj.
    28. Sex in Race Psychology. — The influence of the fact of sex in the development of forms of association and of social activity and structure. Based principally on data from the natural races, and from the population of the city of Chicago, with a preliminary consideration of sex in the lower life forms. Mj
  Summer 26. Origins of Social Institutions.— Association and culture in prehistoric times and in tribal life. Designed to supplement the subjects dealing with the institutions of civilization.  Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage, class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. Especial attention to the racial geography of Europe. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
    27. Race Development of Mind.— Organization of habit in the tribal stage. Relation of the psychic life in the group to the group activities, and to the geographical environment. Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. Educational meaning of initiation, secret societies, and tapu. Animistic beliefs and practices, and the influence of analogy, suggestions, and hypnotism in the formation of mind. Language and number. Imitation, invention, and genius. Analysis of the content of consciousness and comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes, and and estimate of the nature of the psychic interval between the natural and the cultural races For graduate students. Mj.
  Autumn 26. Origins of Social Institutions.— Association and culture in prehistoric times and in tribal life. Designed to supplement the subjects dealing with the institutions of civilization.  Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage, class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. Especial attention to the racial geography of Europe. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
    30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tribute, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
1901 Winter 24. Sociological Function of Art and Play. — The relation of aesthetic activities to other forms of race activity and consciousness. Animal play and rudimentary expression of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. Art and play in Chicago. For graduate students. Mj.
    27. Race Development of Mind.— Organization of habit in the tribal stage. Relation of the psychic life in the group to the group activities, and to the geographical environment. Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. Educational meaning of initiation, secret societies, and tapu. Animistic beliefs and practices, and the influence of analogy, suggestions, and hypnotism in the formation of mind. Language and number. Imitation, invention, and genius. Analysis of the content of consciousness and comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes, and and estimate of the nature of the psychic interval between the natural and the cultural races For graduate students. Mj.
  Spring [Not scheduled to teach]
  Summer 24. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work Art and gaming in Chicago. From the standpoint of origins. Mj.
    26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
  Autumn 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
    30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
1902 Winter 24. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work Art and gaming in Chicago. From the standpoint of origins. Mj.
    27. Development of Mind in the Race.— Formation of habit in the tribal stage. Relation of the psychic life in the group to the group activities. Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. Educational meaning of initiation, secret societies, and tapu. Animistic beliefs and practices, and the influence of analogy, suggestions, and hypnotism in the formation of mind. Language and number. Imitation, invention, and genius. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes, and and estimate of the nature of the psychic interval between the natural and the cultural races. Mj.
  Spring [Not scheduled to teach]
  Summer 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
    30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
  Autumn 24. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work Art and gaming in Chicago.. Mj.
    26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
1903 Winter 27. Development of Mind in the Race.— Formation of habit in the tribal stage. Relation of the psychic life in the group to the group activities. Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. Educational meaning of initiation, secret societies, and tapu. Animistic beliefs and practices, and the influence of analogy, suggestions, and hypnotism in the formation of mind. Language and number. Imitation, invention, and genius. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes, and and estimate of the nature of the psychic interval between the natural and the cultural races. Mj.
    30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
  Spring [Not scheduled to teach]
  Summer 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
    30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
  Autumn 24. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work Art and gaming in Chicago.. Mj.
    26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
1904 Winter 27. Development of Mind in the Race.— Formation of habit in the tribal stage. Relation of the psychic life in the group to the group activities. Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. Educational meaning of initiation, secret societies, and tapu. Animistic beliefs and practices, and the influence of analogy, suggestions, and hypnotism in the formation of mind. Language and number. Imitation, invention, and genius. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes, and and estimate of the nature of the psychic interval between the natural and the cultural races. Mj.
    30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
  Spring [Not scheduled to teach]
  Summer 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
  Autumn 24. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work Art and gaming in Chicago.. Mj.
    26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
1905 Winter 27. Development of Mind in the Race.— Formation of habit in the tribal stage. Relation of the psychic life in the group to the group activities. Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. Educational meaning of initiation, secret societies, and tapu. Animistic beliefs and practices, and the influence of analogy, suggestions, and hypnotism in the formation of mind. Language and number. Imitation, invention, and genius. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes, and and estimate of the nature of the psychic interval between the natural and the cultural races. Mj.
    30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
    32. The Negro in Africa and America.  Mj
  Spring [Not scheduled to teach]
  Summer 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
    27. Mental Development in the Race. — A genetic study of the relation of mind to individual and social activities. The psychology of mechanical and artistic invention. Relation of language to thought. Systems of number, time, weight, and measure in early society. Development of ideas of causation. Parallelism in development between the individual and the race. The effect of genius on the mental life of a group. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes. For graduate students. Mj.
  Autumn 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
    27. Mental Development in the Race. — A genetic study of the relation of mind to individual and social activities. The psychology of mechanical and artistic invention. Relation of language to thought. Systems of number, time, weight, and measure in early society. Development of ideas of causation. Parallelism in development between the individual and the race. The effect of genius on the mental life of a group. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes. For graduate students. Mj.
1906 Winter 24. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work Art and gaming in Chicago.. Mj.
    32. The Negro in Africa and America.  Mj
  Spring [Not scheduled to teach]
  Summer 26A. Social Origins. 1/2 Mj
    27A. Mental Development in the Race. 1/2 Mj.
  Autumn 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and Graduates students. Mj.
    27. Mental Development in the Race. — A genetic study of the relation of mind to individual and social activities. The psychology of mechanical and artistic invention. Relation of language to thought. Systems of number, time, weight, and measure in early society. Development of ideas of causation. Parallelism in development between the individual and the race. The effect of genius on the mental life of a group. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes. For graduate students. Mj.
1907 Winter 29. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tattooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work Art and gaming in Chicago.. Mj.
    32. The Negro in Africa and America. — Prerequisite: Course 26
  Spring [Not scheduled to teach]
  Summer 26A.  Social Origins. Mj
    27A. Mental Development in the Race. Mj
  Autumn 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and graduates students. Mj.
    27. Mental Development in the Race. — A genetic study of the relation of mind to individual and social activities. The psychology of mechanical and artistic invention. Relation of language to thought. Systems of number, time, weight, and measure in early society. Development of ideas of causation. Parallelism in development between the individual and the race. The effect of genius on the mental life of a group. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes. For graduate students. Mj.
1908 Winter [Not scheduled to teach]
  Spring 30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
    32. The Mind of the Oriental.Mj.
  Summer 26A.  Social Origins. Mj
    30A. Primitive Social Control. Mj.
    29. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tatooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work. Mj.
  Autumn 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and graduates students. Mj.
    27. Mental Development in the Race. — A genetic study of the relation of mind to individual and social activities. The psychology of mechanical and artistic invention. Relation of language to thought. Systems of number, time, weight, and measure in early society. Development of ideas of causation. Parallelism in development between the individual and the race. The effect of genius on the mental life of a group. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes. For graduate students. Mj.
1909 Winter 30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tapu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
    32. The Mind of the Oriental — Mental life and educational systems of the far east, with particular reference to Japan and China. Mj.
  Spring 33. Savage Childhood. — Education of the child among the Africans, Australians, Malayans, Polynesians, and American Indians. For graduate students. Mj.
  Summer 26A. Social Origins.
    30A. Primitive Social Control
  Autumn 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and graduates students. Mj.
    27. Mental Development in the Race. — A genetic study of the relation of mind to individual and social activities. The psychology of mechanical and artistic invention. Relation of language to thought. Systems of number, time, weight, and measure in early society. Development of ideas of causation. Parallelism in development between the individual and the race. The effect of genius on the mental life of a group. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes. For graduate students. Mj.
1910 Winter 30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tabu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
    35. The Immigrant. From the mental standpoint. The social, occupational, and mental life of the immigrant in Europe, and the problems and processes of his accommodation to American society. For graduates. Mj.
  Spring 29. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tatooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work. Mj.
    31. Origin and Psychology of the Occupations.— Prerequisite: course 27.
  Summer [Not scheduled to teach]
  Autumn 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and graduates students. Mj.
    27. Mental Development in the Race. — A genetic study of the relation of mind to individual and social activities. The psychology of mechanical and artistic invention. Relation of language to thought. Systems of number, time, weight, and measure in early society. Development of ideas of causation. Parallelism in development between the individual and the race. The effect of genius on the mental life of a group. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes. For graduate students. Mj.
1911 Winter 30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tabu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj. [this course was not taught]
    35. The Immigrant. From the mental standpoint. The social, occupational, and mental life of the immigrant in Europe, and the problems and processes of his accommodation to American society. For graduates. Mj.[this course was not taught]
  Spring 29. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tatooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work. Mj. [this course was not taught]
    31. Origin and Psychology of the Occupations.— Prerequisite: course 27.[this course was not taught]
  Summer 26A. Social Origins.— [no description provided]
    30. Primitive Social Control.— A study of primitive juridical and political systems and of social conventions. Family, clan, tribal, and military organization, totemism, tribal and property marks, tabu, personal property and property in land, periodical tribal assemblies and ceremonies, secret societies, medicine-men and priests, caste, blood-vengeance, salutations, gifts, tributes, oaths, and forms of offense and punishment, among typical tribes of Australia and Oceania, Africa, Asia, and America. Mj.
  Autumn 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and graduates students. Mj.
    35. The Immigrant. From the mental standpoint. The social, occupational, and mental life of the immigrant in Europe, and the problems and processes of his accommodation to American society. For graduates. Mj.
1912 Winter [Not scheduled to teach]
  Spring 27. Mental Development in the Race. — A genetic study of the relation of mind to individual and social activites. The psychology of mechanical and artistic invention. Relation of language to thought. Systems of number, time, weight, and measure in early society. Development of ideas of causation. Parallelism in development between the individual and the race. The effect of genius on the mental life of a group. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes. For graduate students. Mj.
    29. Art and the Artist Class.—From the sociological point of view, and with particular reference to origins. Animal play and rudimentary expressions of art in animal societies. Mutilation, artificial deformations, stimulants, ornament, dress, tatooing, the dance, music, poetry, painting, sculpture, technology, ceremonial, humor, and play among the natural races. The relation of art to work. Mj.
  Summer [Not scheduled to teach]
  Autumn [Not scheduled to teach]
1913 Winter [Not scheduled to teach]
  Spring 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrationss, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and graduates students. Mj.
    35. The European Peasant. — From the mental standpoint. The social, occupational, and mental life of the immigrant in Europe, and the problems and process of his accommodation to American society. For graduates. German necessary. Mj.
  Summer [Not scheduled to teach]
  Autumn 26. Social Origins.— Association and culture in tribal society. Early food conditions, migrations, and race-crossings. Origins and relations of invention, trade, warfare, art, marriage. Class distinctions, the professions, legal, political, and ecclesiastical institutions. Ethnological reading. An introductory course. For Senior College and graduates students. Mj.
1914 Winter [Not scheduled to teach]
  Spring 27. Mental Development in the Race. — A genetic study of the relation of mind to individual and social activites. The psychology of mechanical and artistic invention. Relation of language to thought. Systems of number, time, weight, and measure in early society. Development of ideas of causation. Parallelism in development between the individual and the race. The effect of genius on the mental life of a group. Comparison of the mental traits of different races, epochs, and social classes. For graduate students. Mj.
    35. The European Peasant. — From the mental standpoint. The social, occupational, and mental life of the immigrant in Europe, and the problems and process of his accommodation to American society. For graduates. German necessary. Mj.
  Summer [Not scheduled to teach]
  Autumn 3. Social Origins.—An examination of the sentiments, moral attitudes, and mental traits of primitive man, and a study of their expression in the activities and organizations of tribal society, with an indication of the grade of culture reached by mankind before historical times, and of the processes involved in the transition from the types of a primary to that of a secondary group. An introductory course, designed to give the student acquaintance with the evolutionary character of social processes and access to a considerable mass of concrete data. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Desirable antecedent courses: Zoology 5, Philosophy 2. Mj
    30. The Social Attitudes. — The elemental instincts and impulses; types of temperament and character ; the nature of inhibitions in individuals and groups through which social attitudes are developed and fixed; race-prejudice, ethnocentrism, and prestige; a determination of the private moral life going on in the individual in contrast with the more formal preceptual and conventional moral codes of society; a comparison of the mores of different races, historical epochs, and social classes; the use of  ethnographical materials, biographies, and other personal documents. Prerequisite: course 3, or 4 majors in Psychology. Mj.
1915 Winter [Not scheduled to teach]
  Spring 3. Social Origins.—An examination of the sentiments, moral attitudes, and mental traits of primitive man, and a study of their expression in the activities and organizations of tribal society, with an indication of the grade of culture reached by mankind before historical times, and of the processes involved in the transition from the types of a primary to that of a secondary group. An introductory course, designed to give the student acquaintance with the evolutionary character of social processes and access to a considerable mass of concrete data. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Desirable antecedent courses: Zoology 5, Philosophy 2. Mj
    33. Prostitution. — Prerequisite: 11 and 30. Desirable antecedents: Sociology 5, Political Economy 16. German or French necessary.
  Summer [Not scheduled to teach]
  Autumn 3. Social Origins.—An examination of the sentiments, moral attitudes, and mental traits of primitive man, and a study of their expression in the activities and organizations of tribal society, with an indication of the grade of culture reached by mankind before historical times, and of the processes involved in the transition from the types of a primary to that of a secondary group. An introductory course, designed to give the student acquaintance with the evolutionary character of social processes and access to a considerable mass of concrete data. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Desirable antecedent courses: Zoology 5, Philosophy 2. Mj
    30. The Social Attitudes. — The elemental instincts and impulses; types of temperament and character ; the nature of inhibitions in individuals and groups through which social attitudes are developed and fixed; race-prejudice, ethnocentrism, and prestige; a determination of the private moral life going on in the individual in contrast with the more formal preceptual and conventional moral codes of society; a comparison of the mores of different races, historical epochs, and social classes; the use of  ethnographical materials, biographies, and other personal documents. Prerequisite: course 3, or 4 majors in Psychology. Mj.
    45. The European Peasant. — With particular reference to the Poles and Italians. Prerequisite: course 30. Desirable antecedents: course 60. German or Italian necessary. Mj. Spring.
1916 Winter [Not scheduled to teach]
  Spring 32. The Psychology of Divergent Types. — A study of antisocial, equivocal, psychically divergent, and socially isolated individuals and groups. The contrast between the impulses and inhibitions of those divergent types and those of the savage and of the modern habitudinal man. The relation of crime and other antisocial expressions to divergent predispositions, and to the peculiar strains which these predispositions, and to the peculiar strains which these predispositions encounter in the organization of modern society. An examination in this connection of (1) the gypsy, the pariah, the "poor white," the Russian "beggar-community," and of (2) the vagabond, the hobo, the criminal, the prostitute, the moron, and the man of genius. Prerequisite: course 11 and 30. Desired antecedent course 52. Mj.
    33. Prostitution. — Prerequisite: 11 and 30. Desirable antecedents: Sociology 5, Political Economy 16. German or French necessary.
    45. The European Peasant. — With particular reference to the Poles and Italians. Prerequisite: course 30. Desirable antecedents: course 60. German or Italian necessary. Mj. Spring.
  Summer [Not scheduled to teach]
  Autumn 3. Social Origins. — Mj.
    30. The Social Attitudes. — Mj.
1917 Winter [Not scheduled to teach]
  Spring 3. Social Origins. — Mj.
    32. Divergent Types. — Mj.
    33. Prostitution. — Mj.
    45. The European Peasant. —  Mj.
  Summer 30. The Social Attitudes.— Mj.
  Autumn 45. Races and Nationalities.— Mj.
1918 Winter [Not scheduled to teach]
  Spring 32. Theory of Disorganization. — Mj. Course Cancelled
    46. Research Course. — Mj. Course Cancelled

Notes

 

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